Katie Luther: An Encourager

This book review was recently presented to the pastors’ wives in correlation with the session on Encouragement at the National Church Planters’ Conference in Mentor Ohio, sponsored by ARCH Ministries.  These sessions were adapted from my ladies’ Sunday School series on Biblical Womanhood created for Meadowlands Baptist Church of Edmonton.

The short book Luther and His Katie by Dolina MacCuish gives us a wonderful example of the encouragement a pastor’s wife can be to her husband.  With just short chapters and only 125 pages, this little gem of a book is worth adding to your library.

The first chapters give a brief overview of Luther’s rise to prominence as his studies and experiences enlightened him concerning the false claims of Romanism.  Joining in his renunciation of unbiblical practices were many priests and nuns, one of whom was Catherine von Bora.  Luther felt responsible to marry off these liberated nuns, finally taking Catherine as his own wife.  Though not a love match at first, Luther grew to deeply love and depend on his wife.

God used Catherine, whom Luther affectionately called Katie, to encourage, strengthen, and even protect Luther from illness and harm.  She was an industrious worker, thrifty and graced with good business sense.  Their home was regularly filled with students, clerics, and friends, providing the challenge of housekeeping and hospitality for the Luthers.  Luther’s reckless generosity was counterbalanced by Katie’s careful household planning and management so that he occasionally referred to her as “my Lord Katie.”

Luther’s commendation of his dear wife summarizes the tone of the book.  “Next to God’s Word, the world has no more precious treasure than holy matrimony.  God’s best gift is a pious, cheerful, God-fearing wife, with whom you may live peacefully, to whom you may entrust your goods, your body, and life.”

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