Friday’s Fave Five #76

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It’s Friday, time to look back over the blessings of the week with Susanne at Living to Tell the Story and other friends. And yes, I realize I am once again posting this on Saturday. 🙂

Break in the weather After a couple of very cold weeks, we’ve enjoyed a week of unseasonably warm weather. A lovely break for Albertans in January!

Christmas banquet in January Our church’s Christmas banquet was held last Saturday. (Yes, we know it’s after Christmas, but people are not as busy in mid-January as they generally are in December.) Several ladies in our church did the catering this time and the result was fantastic! It was the best catered meal we’ve ever had at the church.

Word with Friends all time high score for one word – crimples – which crossed both a triple and a double word tile with the ‘m’ on a triple letter tile. I was trying to clear my letter tray and rearranged the letters until I saw the word. I tried to play it, unsure if it was even a word, but it is!! It means to crimp, curl, or wave, but can also mean to wrinkle or crumple. The score for that one word? 191 points. That will likely stand as my high score forever!

 Finishing a big project I have the majority of the work done on a research and writing project I have had on my ‘to do’ list on for several months. It needs only final editing to be complete. Yay!

Answer to prayer A friend had brain surgery last July to remove a tumor behind her ear. She has recovered well, but had the ongoing side effect of double vision. Many have been praying that God would resolve that problem and this week he did just that!

I haven’t done much with photography or cards the past few weeks. Here are a few fun pictures with friends and family from our trip to Shanghai last month.

Jade figure in store window

Jade figure in store window

Future chef

Future chef

My favorite Minnie Mouse

My favorite Minnie Mouse

Fetching the wheelchair for Granny

Fetching the wheelchair for Granny

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Happy baby

 

My very own Mad Hatter

My very own Mad Hatter

Shanghai sycamores

Shanghai sycamores

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When Critical Illness Hits Home, part 2

“We have done all we can do.”Edinburgh (18)

Several of us were gathered around the crib in our baby son’s hospital room.  There was a somber and surreal atmosphere, as if we were observers of someone else’s drama.  “We have done all we can do,” our doctor told us.  “David’s kidneys have shut down.  Unless his kidneys begin working, I don’t think your son will live through the night.”

Pouring out his heart in prayer

My mother-in-law and our Christian doctor stood with us as we looked on our son’s listless form.   My husband clasped my hand and began pouring his heart out before the Lord. “Lord, this child was a gift from you.  You formed him, You gave him life, and You have a purpose for him.  We love our son, Lord, and we don’t want him to die.  But Lord, we want Your will, even if that means our son will go to be with You.  Please God, make David’s kidneys work. You are the Great Physician and can heal him in an instant.  But if you choose not to heal David, please give us the grace to glorify You in our sorrow.”

Quiet prayer

Medical personnel quietly moved in and out of the dimly-lit room taking vital signs and checking the IV. Someone removed even the diaper from our son’s fever-ravaged body in hopes that the air would help cool him.  We all continued to quietly pray.  We tried to figure out if we could have taken action sooner.  We went over the details of the day and we prayed some more.  Someone pulled a chair up to the bed for me, “You’re pregnant and need to rest.”  Someone else offered to get us something to eat.  Funny thing, in all of the urgency of the day I wasn’t at all hungry and had never once thought about the fact that I was indeed halfway through my second pregnancy.

“Please God, would You spare our son?”

The ward had several other pediatric meningitis patients.  We asked a few questions and learned that some children diagnosed with symptoms as severe as David’s have permanent disability such as deafness or brain damage, and, as we knew was possible, some die.  “Please God, would You spare our son?”

Answered prayer

Weariness set in as the strain of the day began catching up with us.  Our conversation dwindled to an occasional murmured comment or prayer.  Our doctor walked back in to the room.  As he checked David’s IV, a stream of urine shot up from the bed.  We began to clap and cheer and cry with joy.  God had answered our prayers and caused David’s kidneys to work!

Our son was in hospital for ten days.  He slowly began healing and we were finally able to take him home with us.  He was neither deaf nor brain damaged – God had returned him to us and we did not want to take that lightly.

Standing at death’s door brings a reality check

Even though we mouth the words, “Not my will, Lord, but thine,” many young people retain a feeling of invincibility because of the vigor and stamina of youth.  Standing at death’s door brings a reality check and forces us to acknowledge that our times are truly in His hands. We learned much about faith, prayer, surrender and grief those days.  We had a new understanding of the verses which tell us that life is a brief vapor.  We developed a deeper appreciation of the gift that life is.

Practical help

During these days of hospitalization, treatment and recovery we were blessed with the prayers of many, both friends and strangers.  Following my continuing theme of practical help in times of suffering and grief, I want to mention some specific things which were a help to us during our son’s hospitalization.

  • A lady in our church came to visit me in the hospital.  Several years earlier her daughter had contracted meningitis and recovered from it.  This dear woman’s willingness to share her experiences was a great encouragement and helped me know I wasn’t alone in this trial.
  • We needed someone at the hospital with our son around the clock.  Family and friends signed up to take shifts so my husband could return to work and so I could get some rest.
  • Meals, laundry and cleaning were taken care of by others.
  • Some provided money for hospital parking.  This can be expensive when you have to park every day for a prolonged period of time.
  • We lived in the States at the time and were without medical insurance.  Though the hospital initially wanted to transfer our son out of the hospital because we had no insurance, our doctor and family members spoke in our behalf so he could stay.  It took several years, but God gave my husband and I both work so the debt could be repaid.  Sometimes you need an advocate in the midst of a critical illness.
  • We received many notes and cards of encouragement.
  • During the crisis I felt totally calm and my husband was agitated.  It was a great help when our doctor told us that in his experience, one parent often is stoic at first and falls apart after the crisis has passed and the other is anxious first and very calm when their loved one is out of danger.  After we brought David home from hospital, I would sit in my rocking chair cuddling him and crying and my husband joked and played with our son.

“Why crying, Mama?”

Shortly after we bought David home from his hospital stay we learned of another seminary family whose baby daughter had just died of meningitis.  As I rocked David and prayed for this family, tears flowed down.  David reached his little hand up and wiped my tears saying, “Why crying, Mama?”  We prayed together for this bereaved family and I told God I didn’t understand why our son was spared while this family experienced such loss.

Hold the loosely

So we asked God for wisdom in rearing this recovered child believing that God had a particular purpose for our son’s life because this child had been returned to us.  Thus began our understanding of holding our children loosely because they are God’s and He has loaned them to us for an indeterminate period of time.